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Clams - Live, Hard Shell, Littleneck, Wild, USA, Dozen

In stock
Live
Wild
$14.50
/ dozen

Littleneck clams are the smallest of the hardshell clams with a mild, briny ocean flavor and very tender flesh.  Similar to their east coast cousins, the Cherrystone and Topneck, but a smaller size that is slightly mellower and sweeter. 

  • Our Littleneck clams are harvested along the Atlantic coast from Maine to Florida and delivered live.
  • They are named after Little Neck Bay on Long Island.
  • Littleneck clam stocks aren't depleted or experiencing overfishing.
  • Littleneck clams are excellent served raw.
  • Cherrystone, Topneck, and Littleneck clams are all the same species of Atlantic hard-shells or quahogs. The name refers to the size.
  • To clean, or purge the clams of sand and sediment, we recommend soaking clams in salted water in the fridge for 30 minutes before cooking.
  • The colorful shells were once highly valued and used as currency for Native Americans.
Amount | % Daily Value
Amount | % Daily Value

Calories

110

Protein (g)

17


Serving Size

12 Clams

Sodium (mg)

95 | 4


Calories from Fat

N/A

Saturated Fat

N/A


Cholesterol (mg)

80 | 27

Total Carbohydrate (g)

6 | 2


Calcium

8

Total Fat (g)

1.5


Iron

30

Vitamin A

10


Omega 3 (mg)

200

Vitamin C

0


Potassium

470 | 13

Amount/% Daily Value

Calories:

110


Serving Size:

12 Clams


Calories from Fat:

N/A


Cholesterol (mg)

80 | 27


Calcium

8


Iron

30


Omega 3 (mg)

200


Potassium

470 | 13


Protein (g)

17


Sodium (mg)

95 | 4


Saturated Fat

N/A


Total Carbohydrate (g)

6 | 2


Total Fat (g)

1.5


Vitamin A

10


Vitamin C

0

Info Source: U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Other Names

Hard Clam, Northern Quahog, Quahog, Round Clam, Chowder Clam

Product Questions

Check out our How to Shuck Oysters blog for step by step instructions on oyster shucking at home! 

To shuck clams, simply: 

  1. Get a proper shucking knife. You'll need a thin, 3" shucking knife that has a rounded tip that makes it ideal for shucking your clams. Don't confuse this with a pointed oyster knife, which is used differently. If you don't have one of these, make sure you use a small, sharp knife.
  2. Grasp a clam in your hand. Use a towel to hold the clam in your hand. This will protect your hand when you pry open the clam shell with a knife. If you really feel unsteady, you can also wear gloves. Make sure the hinge of the clam shell is nestled in the area of your palm nearest your thumb. The opening of the clam should be at your fingertips. You can also press down on the clam a bit to give it some added pressure to make it easier to pry it open with the knife.
  3. Insert the tip of a paring or clam knife in between the clam shells. Press into the clam, right into the muscle. Alternately, you can insert the knife at the hinge of the shell, but then you'd have to use a lot more pressure to try to break open the hinge and shuck the clam that way. You'll have to squeeze the knife between the shells to loosed the adductor muscles and the hinge of the shells.
  4. Twist your knife. Continue to twist the knife until you break the seal of the clam and your knife is inside the clam shell. Don't force it too much and be careful not to cut your hand. Use the knife more as a form of leverage than force. You will use the knife to pry open the top shell of the clam.
  5. Cut around the seal of the clam shell slowly. This will ensure that you've cut the hinge of the clam shell and are ready to open the clam. Cut the upper adductors and take off the top shell. When the clam is ready, you will hear a nice snapping sound.
  6. Remove the top shell. Using your fingers, pull the top shell off of the clam. Try to save the clam juice, which is a delicious part of the clam.
  7. Cut the clam out of the bottom shell. Just slip the knife under the clam meat to loosen those lower adductors of the clam. Place each clam in a top shell to assemble clams on a half-shell, or prepare the clams according to a recipe. You can place the clams on ice until you're ready to eat or cook them. (this information sourced from https://www.wikihow.com/Shuck-Clams
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Hard clams - littleneck, topneck, cherrystones and chowder clams - are found all along the eastern seaboard, from Canada to Florida. They are all the same species of clam, just different sizes: 

  • Littlenecks: 1 ½” - 2” wide
  • Topnecks: 2 - 3” wide
  • Cherrystones: 3 - 4”
  • Chowder Clams: 4”+

Clams are available by either the dozen or pound. This information can be found next to the product price 

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